Tuesday, March 21, 2006

snow blossoms



I think every year that I've lived in Española (My family moved here in 1984) I've seen the apricot trees blossom first and then we get snow again. It snowed on Sunday night and we had a fresh layer of snow Monday morning, but it had melted by the afternoon. I hope we get some apricots this year. Often times a late freeze will kill the blossoms and the potential fruit. I took these pictures at my brother's house before going to work yesterday.

11 comments:

Hari Singh Khalsa said...

Just out of curiosity, how many people spotted the compost pile in the second picture? I made the pile using shipping palets and placed it very discreetely between two evergreen trees. You can see the front "removable" shipping pallet in the center of the second picture.
Plug: If you don't already compost please look into it. It is very easy, you generate much less waste that goes to the dump, possibly saving you money in garbage collection costs and in the end you derive a beneficial soil for your garden.

Prabhu Singh said...

Hari, maybe you could write an article about the benefits of composting for my blog.
Also in the same article or another maybe you could write down all the problems that we spotted in Amritsar that could be solved by people composting. If you write about Amritsar we could possibly get Sikhnet to publish the article and maybe other Sikh websites and reach a lot of people.

Pritam Singh Khalsa said...

True about compost piles. Me and my family have had them for years,but also the food waste that goes to the dump composes alot at the dump,cause alot of people throw away alot of stuff that shouldnt go to the dump and it rots it quicker to make methane gases that they now capture from wells they make where the gases come out of the ground naturally anyway cause of the decomp. My dad has worked at the dump for ever and has had all the jobs possible and now just pushes buttons like Homer Simpson{he even acts like Homer not intentionally Hahahaha} He said the smartest things dumps have done is capture gases to sell from nothing{almost 100% profit} and burning garbage at nuclear plants instead of costly materials like gases and wood. The world needs to find good uses for our by-products because we produce them anyway. Just my shared thoughts. WAHEGURU JI KA KHALSA WAHEGURU JI KI FATEH!

My of life Pictures said...

How pretty Great Job on the pictures i updated my webpage i love your pictures there i hope to see more of the history and more of the sunsets and the snow there

Anonymous said...

those are really beautiful looking blossoms.....exudes such a serene charm...you're lucky to be living in such a beautiful place

*balwinder kaur*

satvinder said...

wow... so pretty!

Hari Singh Khalsa said...

Gombesa,

It is good that they finally harvest the methane gas produced at the dump. However, it is still a much better solution to compost your organic waste at home rather than allow it to go to the dump. This is because the organic regfuse can never be fully segregated there and therefore some of it goes to waste. Also, the methane production is an anaerobic process where as composting is aerobic. Meaning that if they don't then try and compost the material after they have harvested the methane, they could be potentially producing many harmful pollutants that are then released into the environment. Also, if the dump does separate the organic refuse, they most certainly don't check for contaminants. So if someone decided to use a layer of banana peals to catch their dirty oil during an oil change and then this gets mixed with everything else, this is potentially harmful. Thermophilic composting (composting reaching very hot temperatures) can actually rememdy polluted soil, even soil polluted by oil, however, this is an aerobic process, and therefor no methane can be collected.

I commend you on composting, I've only been doing it for a couple of years now.

Pritam Singh Khalsa said...

True but when they find "hot spots" chemically dangerous areas they dig it up and spray a way less dangerous and polluting chemical in order to try to keep the percentage of polutants down.They do however segregate as much as possible.They cant have environmentally dangerous chemicals just floating around the dump so they are constantly day and night looking for dangerous hot spots. Seagulls and other animals are harmful to the dump from their waste the produce and disease.There really isnt a good way to get rid of them at this time so they just look for a lot of dead animals on the ground, pick up the majority[the diseases would be harmful to the tractor workers their families and the mechanics working on them,also the dump itself{{environment}}]They look for the dead animals to also locate the chemically dangerouas areas that they couldnt detect with meters and thermal machines. But at my new house Im not allowed to have a compost so I watch my garbage pile up slightly more so I have to reuse and recycle alot of things I normally wouldn't. A.e using gerber baby food jars for holding nuts&bolts,washing ziplock bags in the dishwasher,hand washing some foil once to reuse again once,etc. Waheguru ji ka Khalsa Waheguru ji ki fateh!

Preet said...

These GORGEOUS pics kinda make me think of Japan! (even though ive never been there!)

Sikhi Seeker said...

I can't believe how every picture I look at surpasses the previous one. I'm falling short on words now.
p.s.// Snow blossom! Couldn't have been named any better!

Hari Singh Khalsa said...

Gombesa,

You do better then me, I just try and re-use ziplocks with the same item a few time and then I throw it away when it gets funky. I've known others who've washed them, but here water is also a precious resource and I think I might end up using more resources washing them then throwing them away. It's sometimes a challenge to live consciously, balancing different factors to determine what's best to live your life in harmony.
Why are you not allowed to compost at your new place? Is it some sort of neighborhood association rule? If so, that is outrageous and morally and environmentally irresponsible, to not allow someone who is willing to compost the ability to compost.